01 10 / 2011

29 9 / 2011

theafrosistuh:

lowendtheory:

abaldwin360:

ATLANTA, Sept. 26, 2011, 4 p.m. - President Obama candidly Friday took a little time to explain how he tried to save Troy Davis and why he did not say anything about his controversial execution, two sources told Redding News Review.

Obama’s White House spent “three days” looking at how it could legally get involved in the case on a federal level, one source said. The Obama administration even called the state of Georgia about getting involved and were told “No”. (Updated on Sept. 27 at 3 p.m. ET - The source said the president never called and was only concerned about an injustice, as he would do for any American).

“‘We looked at every possible avenue legally,’” the source reported Obama said. “‘There was not one there.’”

“‘It was a state case and I could not intervene because it wasn’t federal,’” another source reported Obama said.

The two sources told Redding News Review that Obama talked about Davis, during a private lunch meeting of about 10 select black broadcasters.

Obama said the only reason why he spoke about Harvard’s Henry Louis Gates’ case, was because he was asked by a reporter, Obama told one source.

What’s more, Obama also said that the only reason why his administration spoke out about an illegal immigrant’s case, Humberto Leal Garcia Jr., in July was because it was an international issue, where his rights were violated.

Sure, the president could have simply spoken out about Davis, the source said, but it would not have done anything.

“‘I don’t want to make this man’s death political for me,’” Obama told the source.

“Sure, the president could have simply spoken out about Davis, the source said, but it would not have done anything.”

If this story is true, it is a fucking pathetic sham.  It wouldn’t have done anything legally, but it would have conferred a sense of legitimacy at a crucial and decisive political moment from a person who, in addition to having a doctorate in godforsaken jurisprudence, happens to have also been a professor of law and happens—oh yeah—to be the fucking President of the United States.  

There is nothing reassuring for me in the knowledge that the President was working behind the scenes in search of a way to intervene legally in the execution of Troy Davis.  In fact, it makes his silence even more revolting.  What matters, of course, is that we’re learning this after the fact.  We’re learning that one of the least helpless people in the entire world is claiming that he was helpless.  And this should tell us something about President Obama’s very philosophy of what it means to be president, of what it means to occupy the seat of power responsibly, about what it means to do politics.

But should we really be surprised?  There is nothing in his silence in the face of the state-sanctioned murder of a man convicted of a crime he likely didn’t commit that is inconsistent with much that President Obama has done since he’s been in office.  He has, after all, continued wars that and drone strikes that have killed an estimated 132,000 civilians in Afghanistan and Iraq.  What stretch of the imagination would allow us expect him to interrupt the war at home?  He is pro-death penalty, even in spite of having been Senator of a state that had to declare a moratorium on it after learning of a series of wrongful convictions. 

What is remarkable about Obama is not that he is silent in the face of injustice.  What is remarkable, rather, is that people on the left continue to expect that he will behave otherwise.  He’s not the helpless good guy who just doesn’t quite have the power to do what he really wants right now.  He’s the imperialist who works extremely hard to project the fact that, in private, or deep in his heart, he knows better.  That’s the image that articles like this seek to create, and that is precisely what makes his political behavior and choices all the more incorrigible.  

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I Bolded that shit!!! Thank you for giving words to my thoughts!!! Thank you!

I don’t understand how speaking on it would have been a problem though. If you just come out and said “I tried to do everything I could but there was nothing that could be done” how that makes it political. I mean I already knew there was nothing he could do but this is kinda strange. I understand he has to be careful with everything he does but he’s TOO careful at times.

(Source: reddingnewsreview.com, via etherealxxeyes)

26 9 / 2011

madamethursday:

[Image: A very old, grainy black and white mug shot photograph of Lena Baker, a black woman wearing glasses and a headscarf, holding a numbered plate up.]
unapproachableblackchicks:

Meet LENA BAKER. A poor Black woman from Culbreath Georgia who’s claim to fame was being the first and only woman to be executed in the state of Georgia by electric chair in 1945. Her crime? Defending herself against the advances of an abusive white employer, who was going to kill her, if she didn’t kill him first. Lena Baker’s story has been largely ignored by the history books, but it speaks to the historical injustice that Blacks have endured and are still enduring today at the hands of the “justice” system. I keep her spirit in my heart as we await the outcome of this Troy Davis fiasco … hoping that just for once, history doesn’t repeat itself. - CB

“What I done, I did in self-defense, or I would have been killed myself. Where I was I could not overcome it. God has forgiven me. I have nothing against anyone. I picked cotton for Mr. Pritchett, and he has been good to me. I am ready to go. I am one in the number. I am ready to meet my God. I have a very strong conscience.”

madamethursday:

[Image: A very old, grainy black and white mug shot photograph of Lena Baker, a black woman wearing glasses and a headscarf, holding a numbered plate up.]

unapproachableblackchicks:

Meet LENA BAKER. A poor Black woman from Culbreath Georgia who’s claim to fame was being the first and only woman to be executed in the state of Georgia by electric chair in 1945. Her crime? Defending herself against the advances of an abusive white employer, who was going to kill her, if she didn’t kill him first. Lena Baker’s story has been largely ignored by the history books, but it speaks to the historical injustice that Blacks have endured and are still enduring today at the hands of the “justice” system. I keep her spirit in my heart as we await the outcome of this Troy Davis fiasco … hoping that just for once, history doesn’t repeat itself. - CB

“What I done, I did in self-defense, or I would have been killed myself. Where I was I could not overcome it. God has forgiven me. I have nothing against anyone. I picked cotton for Mr. Pritchett, and he has been good to me. I am ready to go. I am one in the number. I am ready to meet my God. I have a very strong conscience.”

(via dynastylnoire)

23 9 / 2011

warallthetime:

loveyourchaos:

20julyplot:

The tragic debacle that has been the Troy Davis execution has another dimension to it beyond racism, classism, and the miscarriage of justice in a flawed system. That dimension is capitalism: specifically, the corporatization of the prison-industrial complex. If you’ve noticed some angry tweets directed at @correcthealth in the past day, that’s because “CorrectHealth” is the Orwellian-named “medical company” that, according to the ACLU, “oversees all executions in Georgia” including last night’s. It is a for-profit company that stands to make a pile of money off of every execution.

wow, just wow.

Holy fuck.

i want to fucking throw up

Is this for real? WTF?

(Source: aloofshahbanou)

23 9 / 2011

mixedbyziggy:

Reggie Clemons could be the next Troy Davis.

From http://www.justiceforreggie.com:

In 1991, two young women went missing after visiting the abandoned Chain of Rocks Bridge in St. Louis Missouri — a popular hang-out with local teens — with their cousin. The cousin…

(via lolagetslife)

22 9 / 2011

22 9 / 2011

poeticdeefect:

soulfulandtrue:

“Georgia has blood on it’s hands.”

Judge Mathis weighs in on the execution of Troy Davis.

Articulated as best as it could be… well done Judge Mathis… Well Done.

(via deezcandiedyamztho)

22 9 / 2011

landonsheely:

“Keep the faith. The fight is bigger than me.” Troy Davis
Let this be the beginning of the end for capital punishment.

landonsheely:

“Keep the faith. The fight is bigger than me.” Troy Davis

Let this be the beginning of the end for capital punishment.

(via thecarlyle)

22 9 / 2011

naygah:

Dear Amerikkka

What do you want from me? I came and literally built you a country from scratch. I was your first commodity on your beloved Wall Street. My blood sweat and tears is in the soil to this day. I took care of your kids, I cleaned your house, I cooked your food all while not demanding nothing in return. What did you give me? You Willie Lynched me, you lynched me. You whipped me, you raped my women, you sold my children, you told me I was less than a whole human being. You killed my leaders: Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Huey Newton, Fred Hampton, Tupac. You call me colored,  negro, nigger, african american, black, afro american. I gave you math, science, language, medicine, astronomy, and spirituality. You in turn gave me Jesus, you ain’t playing to fair. I begged for civil rights, when all along I should have been demanding human rights. I joined your military fought in your wars (Civil War, Revolutionary War, Korean War, Gulf Wars, Afghanistan, Iraq, Vietnam, Libya, WWI WWII) and all along I was fighting a war when I got back home. Why do you treat me with such jealousy and hatred? Now what are you to do since I’m rising again? I’ve taken  all that you have to offer as you see I’m still here. If I made it in Amerikkka I got a feeling I can make it anywhere in this Multi-Verse. Yeah you still got a few of my people in mental bondage but don’t worry FREEDOM is theirs to the moment they seek it.

Signed Your Problem

(Source: khaosol, via buttahlove)

22 9 / 2011

dontwalkintime:

Can you?
Click through to commentary and links to more in depth discussions on the cases. There are more differences than just race here (though, it’s difficult to believe that it didn’t play SOME role). One is that the victim in the Davis case was a cop.  A lot of people have pointed out that “remorse” shown in a confession can get you an easier sentence (but are we then giving incentive to innocent people to plead guilty?), despite the fact that Crowe was in fact sentenced to execution after he pleaded guilty (and I’ve seen plenty of psycopaths plead guilty with little to no remorse).
The major facts here are one case had a boat-load of evidence, a guilty plea, and the accused lived. The other had no doubt-free evidence (beyond the later retracted witness statements), and the accused, who had still maintained innocence, was killed. If we’re going to use the death penalty (which I’m against anyway), we should at least be using it in a consistent manner. Which we truly are not.

dontwalkintime:

Can you?

Click through to commentary and links to more in depth discussions on the cases. There are more differences than just race here (though, it’s difficult to believe that it didn’t play SOME role). One is that the victim in the Davis case was a cop.  A lot of people have pointed out that “remorse” shown in a confession can get you an easier sentence (but are we then giving incentive to innocent people to plead guilty?), despite the fact that Crowe was in fact sentenced to execution after he pleaded guilty (and I’ve seen plenty of psycopaths plead guilty with little to no remorse).

The major facts here are one case had a boat-load of evidence, a guilty plea, and the accused lived. The other had no doubt-free evidence (beyond the later retracted witness statements), and the accused, who had still maintained innocence, was killed. If we’re going to use the death penalty (which I’m against anyway), we should at least be using it in a consistent manner. Which we truly are not.

(via bemorefoxxi)

22 9 / 2011

anthonyanaxagorou:

R.I.P Troy Davis 

anthonyanaxagorou:

R.I.P Troy Davis 

(via bemorefoxxi)

22 9 / 2011

itsyourhomegirl:

r-i-o-t:

robot-heart-politics:

squeetothegee:voodoodollhousefurniture:lalie:



 
May 22nd, 2008 
Killer spared from death hours before execution

(Reuters) - The  parole board in the state of Georgia spared a convicted killer from  execution hours before he was due to die by lethal injection on Thursday  and commuted his sentence to life in prison.
The Georgia Board of Pardons  and Paroles made its decision less than three hours before Samuel David  Crowe, 47, was to be executed, according to a spokeswoman for the  state’s prisons.
“After careful and  exhaustive consideration of the requests, the board voted to grant  clemency. The board voted to commute the sentence to life without  parole,” the parole board said.
Crowe’s  death would have marked the third execution since the U.S. Supreme  Court lifted an unofficial moratorium on the death penalty last month.
Crowe  was not present at the parole board hearing in Atlanta. He had already  eaten his last meal and was preparing to enter the execution chamber at  the prison in Jackson, Georgia, Mallie McCord of the Georgia Department  of Corrections said.
In March 1988,  Crowe killed store manager Joseph Pala during a robbery at the lumber  company in Douglas County, west of Atlanta. Crowe, who had previously  worked at the store, shot Pala three times with a pistol, beat him with a  crowbar and a pot of paint.
Crowe pleaded guilty to armed robbery and murder and was sentenced to death the following year.
“David  (Crowe) takes full responsibility for his crime and experiences  profound remorse,” according to Georgians for Alternatives to the Death  Penalty, an advocacy group, who welcomed the board’s decision.
At  Thursday’s hearing, his lawyers presented a dossier of evidence  attesting to his remorse and good behavior in jail, according to local  media reports. The lawyers also said he was suffering from withdrawal  symptoms from a cocaine addiction at the time of the crime.
The  U.S. Supreme Court on April 16 rejected a challenge to the three-drug  cocktail used in most U.S. executions, which opponents claimed inflicted  unnecessary pain. Georgia then conducted an execution on May 5.
Georgia  has executed 41 men since the Supreme Court reinstated the death  penalty in 1973 and this week it had 109 prisoners on death row.

_______________
For a point of comparison.

And an interesting (and completely unsurprising) point of comparison it is.

So he got a stay not because there was doubt he shot is co-worker with a gun and beat the shit out of him with a crowbar and a bucket of paint, but because he was a good boy in jail and was high when he committed the crime.
Duly noted.

Justice is snowblind.

But but but its not about race guize

let me just not be black anymore, k. 


Now this is a way better point of reference than Casey Anthony. THIS is the example to use from now on.

itsyourhomegirl:

r-i-o-t:

robot-heart-politics:

squeetothegee:voodoodollhousefurniture:lalie:

May 22nd, 2008 

Killer spared from death hours before execution

(Reuters) - The parole board in the state of Georgia spared a convicted killer from execution hours before he was due to die by lethal injection on Thursday and commuted his sentence to life in prison.

The Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles made its decision less than three hours before Samuel David Crowe, 47, was to be executed, according to a spokeswoman for the state’s prisons.

“After careful and exhaustive consideration of the requests, the board voted to grant clemency. The board voted to commute the sentence to life without parole,” the parole board said.

Crowe’s death would have marked the third execution since the U.S. Supreme Court lifted an unofficial moratorium on the death penalty last month.

Crowe was not present at the parole board hearing in Atlanta. He had already eaten his last meal and was preparing to enter the execution chamber at the prison in Jackson, Georgia, Mallie McCord of the Georgia Department of Corrections said.

In March 1988, Crowe killed store manager Joseph Pala during a robbery at the lumber company in Douglas County, west of Atlanta. Crowe, who had previously worked at the store, shot Pala three times with a pistol, beat him with a crowbar and a pot of paint.

Crowe pleaded guilty to armed robbery and murder and was sentenced to death the following year.

“David (Crowe) takes full responsibility for his crime and experiences profound remorse,” according to Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, an advocacy group, who welcomed the board’s decision.

At Thursday’s hearing, his lawyers presented a dossier of evidence attesting to his remorse and good behavior in jail, according to local media reports. The lawyers also said he was suffering from withdrawal symptoms from a cocaine addiction at the time of the crime.

The U.S. Supreme Court on April 16 rejected a challenge to the three-drug cocktail used in most U.S. executions, which opponents claimed inflicted unnecessary pain. Georgia then conducted an execution on May 5.

Georgia has executed 41 men since the Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1973 and this week it had 109 prisoners on death row.

_______________

For a point of comparison.

And an interesting (and completely unsurprising) point of comparison it is.

So he got a stay not because there was doubt he shot is co-worker with a gun and beat the shit out of him with a crowbar and a bucket of paint, but because he was a good boy in jail and was high when he committed the crime.

Duly noted.

Justice is snowblind.

But but but its not about race guize

let me just not be black anymore, k. 

Now this is a way better point of reference than Casey Anthony. THIS is the example to use from now on.

(via etherealxxeyes)

22 9 / 2011

super-eklectic1:

be pissed about Troy Davis. Be so pissed that you do something POSITIVE about it.

This. This. This.

(Source: blueklectic)

22 9 / 2011

ohbabyitsvictoria:

RIP Troy Davis 11:08pm est
“An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind”
No physical evidence. No murder weapon found. 7 out of 9 recanted their testimonies. 
Who is Troy Davis?
I AM TROY DAVIS!

ohbabyitsvictoria:

RIP Troy Davis 11:08pm est

“An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind”

No physical evidence. No murder weapon found. 7 out of 9 recanted their testimonies.

Who is Troy Davis?

I AM TROY DAVIS!

(Source: lexohsinsanityy, via istolefrommarcjacobs)

22 9 / 2011

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

The state of Georgia killed Troy Davis tonight.

Despite so much doubt about Troy Davis’s guilt — including seven witnesses who changed or recanted their testimony, and three jurors who convicted Troy who later asked that his life be spared — Georgia’s parole board decided he should die. And so tonight at 11:08 Eastern Time, he was killed by lethal injection.

His sister, Kim Davis, wanted to tell you what her brother said before he died:

“When Troy saw that more than 250,000 Change.org members signed a petition that was delivered to the board in his name, he called to tell me he was deeply moved. He told me he knew that he had supporters around the world, but he had no idea that the support was that widespread.”

Kim has said that she’ll keep fighting, for the next Troy Davis and the one after that. And she knows so many of us will join her in this fight.

Troy Davis was not alone when he died. Thank you for standing with him.

I can’t find words right now. I can only share what I’ve seen. A great injustice was committed tonight.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)